Alarm.com reached out and asked us to build them a custom shuffleboard table for their corporate office. Since we deal with reclaimed wood only we knew we would be challenged to create a regulation-worthy table using wood over 100 years old.

Before we unveil the finished product we thought you might like a little shuffleboard history from Wikipedia:

The full history of shuffleboard is not known. Though there is some knowledge of its development, its actual origins, the place and date where it was first played, remain a mystery. Inevitably, this uncertainty gives rise to some debate, even disagreement, about which country can claim to have invented it. However there is no dispute concerning its age as a form of popular amusement, and in Europe has a history that goes back over 500 years.

The game was played and gambled over by King Henry VIII of England, who prohibited commoners from playing; evidently he did not always win, as the record of royal expenses for 1532 show a payment from the Privy Purse of GB£9, ‘Paied to my lord Wylliam for that he wanne of the kinges grace at shovillaborde’ (today’s spelling: ‘Paid to Lord William, for he won, by the king’s grace, at shovelboard’).

In its goals, form and equipment, shuffleboard shares various features with (and perhaps influences by or upon) many other games, including air hockeybowlsboccecurlingcroquetcarrom and billiards. Historically, the ancient shovelboard, about which little is known, appears to have diverged into modern shuffleboard and sjoelen, and with the former leading to the development of both table shuffleboard and shove ha’penny.[1]

Today, due to its popularity on cruise ships and in retirement homes because of its low physical fitness requirements, the deck game is often associated with the elderly, though it is increasingly popular among younger generations. Its miniaturized tabletop variant is very popular in bars and pubs.

The table that we built is 16′ long with wood reclaimed from a barn in Massachusetts.

Let us know what you think in the comments!

Shuffleboard-Edit

1 Comment

  1. I’m very interested in this. Our youngest son passed away unexpectedly not quite 2 years ago and he thoroughly enjoyed shuffleboard. I’ve been searching for a unique but hopefully not cost prohibitive shuffleboard table for the past year and would love to see what you would charge for this table.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s